video

All posts tagged video

YouTube has closed the City channel for TOS violations

Published July 6, 2019 by justicewg

The Grandview Heights council has been posting videos of their council meetings on YouTube for more than a year. The city administration has also used the channel, posting video of planning meetings with residents, and things like the pool opening. As of July 6, 2019, the channel has been closed because of “Term of service violations”.

How to close a channel on YT

You can get a channel on YT closed with very little work. Just gather a handful of people, ask them to create their own channels, then use the YT complaint process to register a few complaints against a channel. It doesn’t need to be accurate or supportable complaints, at the start of the process you are registering with a bot, and the take down can happen with no human review.

Because it is so simple to close a channel, bad guys have been using it to extort money from some YT creators. This Verge story tells of an extortion scheme that was tried on at least two channels, money was demanded from the owners in order to keep the channel alive. Although I suspect the city was not exactly the same situation – there is no copy-writable content on the channel – the same game might have been used to threaten the city, and when they didn’t pay, another strike caused the closing.

It is also possible that there was no extortion, the people who made the strikes could be home owners who didn’t like the content of the meetings – they don’t want to hear residents speak about issues that could cost them money, so they close the channel down in some lame effort to stop the discussion from happening at all. This is not going to work, the city will not allow complaints to affect the deliberations. But because they could do it, I’m sure the people who did it feel like it was a win for them.

The city now can go through the process of appealing the strikes, and should probably win, and have all the videos returned to public viewing. The problem is that the appeals can take weeks to go through the process. And nothing will stop the people who took the channel down from trying to do it again.

YouTube has problems that are not being solved

The Verge story is from Feb. 2019, I have not heard of any action by YT to improve the process of protecting a channel from frivolous strikes. YT is harming its own property by failing to act, when enough people get tired of all the games that you run into on YT, a competitor will emerge.

The city doesn’t have to put up with YT issues, they can self host the videos. There have never been more than 30 or so downloads of each video the city has produced, they should have no problems with their own host server supplying the bandwidth.

There are also service providers who act like YT and host videos for a fee. These providers don’t make money if content has strikes, it isn’t so easy to take video content down.

I hope the city is successful in appealing the strikes against their channel and returns to posting more meeting videos. But I will understand if they say “enough of YT problems” and go somewhere else.

(Edit) The city is in the process of appealing the strikes. From what I have read, this might be resolved soon, it might take weeks. Check back for more info.

(Later) The video of the City Council Meeting July 1, 2019 has been uploaded to The Internet Archive (thanks to Chief Shaner). This was only one meeting, as of now all the rest of the city videos are unavailable as long as YouTube is reviewing the strikes. There is no way to know how long Google will take to review the city channel.

(edit) More than a month has passed since YT has closed the channel. It is impossible to know if this is because they are taking their time in the review, or if they have found a reason to affirm the closure.

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Six reasons the Grandview school board refuses to make videos of their meetings

Published January 19, 2019 by justicewg

culp-leads-laughterSorry for the clickbait title, but it seems appropriate for the subject. The Grandview Heights school board has a tradition of obstructing inquiries into their actions and deliberations. You can read my featured article for more on why they do this. Most of the time they also claim they don’t have the policy of hindering transparency, and will simply refuse to answer when asked why they don’t do simple things like make video recording of their meetings.

I was able to access this list of reasons that board president Truett and Super Culp came up with that bullet points their lame excuses for not recording meetings. They added “and this isn’t all, we might have more” to the description of this list. If these are the best reasons they could come up with, they need to get more creative – every one of these can be easily dismissed via reading current board policy, or knowledge of video tech.

The six reasons Grandview’s board will never video record meetings

  • ADA compliance, especially with closed captioning
  • Delays in editing due to confidentiality of student names, rights, who may be presenting etc.
  • Platform usage, especially platform that may contain ads
  • copy right issues, considering student groups, theater productions, etc.
  • privacy concerns for private citizens
  • Costs associated with video taping these sessions and ensuring we have met all facets of legal requirements of the law in advance of releasing.

– List of reason for never video recording board meetings created by Truett and Culp

Why the board video opposition list is lame

There will be many block quotes inserted into this point by point take-down of the board, linking to schools that are making videos of board meetings right now. I could find thousands of examples, but I’ll just be focusing on near by locations. Like this FC school system –

Westerville City Schools Board YouTube channel – 114 videos.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLO7Mqfvx9dEJU5zoFIglhQvs7HyimlMfn

ADA compliance

If access to the board meetings was really important, they would already be videoing and captioning the board meetings. At this point there is no access for hearing impaired, there is no sign language interpreter. The meeting are held deep in the building on the second floor, requiring mobility impaired visitors to use an elevator that Culp was claiming has issues, back when he was holding meetings to show off the conditions of the schools.

Was the point of this bullet to complain that captioning is too hard? YouTube can auto-caption at the click of a button, and even if the captions need editing to correct mistakes, the cost would be a fraction of that needed to hire a sign language interpreter. I’m surprised the school chose to talk about ADA compliance, because it highlights the poor job the school is doing right now.

Bexley City Schools YouTube channel

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3Bq8Y1Lmkqpc1ufSoacQ7Q

Read the rest of this entry →

Live YouTube videos of city council meetings now available

Published May 31, 2017 by justicewg

The city council has begun a new chapter in responsiveness to Grandview Heights residents with live video posted to YT as the meetings are in progress. The council has recorded the last four council meetings, with variable quality, but the effort shown is a big step up in opening up meetings and improving responsiveness for the city.

Councilwoman Keeler, as chair of the Communications & Technology Committee, was most responsible for bringing the camera to the council meetings. According to her, the city did look into how some other cities use video to record meetings, but had no special request from the any visitor to the council meetings to start offering live meetings on YT.

The video feed has some rough recording issues, mostly with the audio. Some council members sit back and make it difficult to hear their voices. The worst problem is microphone “thump”, caused by council members shuffling papers or taping the desk, it is magnified by the desktop and gets really annoying when a low “boom” makes listening to quiet voices painful.

They could improve the quality of the sound by placing something soft, like a mouse pad, under each mike.

The video was in low quality 240P resolution for some of the first meetings, but now is at an acceptable 720P HD. The video could be improved by the use of two cameras so that the members with their backs to the camera could be seen better, but that would require a person to be operating a switch live, activating the camera that is pointing at the current speaker.

The real advantage for the residents of the city is to allow us to see how easy it is to get your voice heard before the council. The example above, from the May 15, 2017 Council Meeting, shows how the council spent a full 30 minutes listening to residents proposing a new law that required children to wear helmets while bike riding. The council was not enthusiastic about adding a new law that stacked more work on the city police, but the issue got a full hearing and will probably be under more discussion at future meetings. This level of attention to issues that residents bring before the council is not often seen in larger cities.

If you have not gone before the city council and voiced your concerns about problems on your street, you are missing out on a big part of what makes this a democracy.

Don’t expect video from the school board

Grandview is a city of contrasts, no where so much as the attitudes of the board when compared to the council. The board doesn’t want you to speak, is probably not going to give you answers, and will be sending pigs into space before they volunteer to make video recordings of their meetings.

Board president Jessie Truett has this to say when requested to make audio recordings:

“Today’s (special) meeting was not recorded and as in the past, we do not intend to record future work sessions. “ – Jessie Truett

I don’t think video recordings will be made at board meetings unless a real change happens in the next election.